April 2019 -Things To Do In Vancouver

1st – 21st – The Orchard (After Chekhov), Stanley Industrial Stage, Arts Club; adaptation set in the Okanagan Valley; artsclub.com

1st – 13th – Senior Follies, Deep Cove Shaw Theatre, North Vancouver; charming and lighthearted comedy; deepcovestage.com

1st – 21st – Chimerica, Jericho Arts Centre; thriller about an American photojournalist in China; unitedplayers.com

2nd – 13th – The Tashme Project: The Living Archives; Firehall Arts Centre; traces the history and common experience of the second generation Japanese Canadians; firehallartscentre.ca

4th – 13th – Glory; Gateway Theatre, Richmond; based on a women’s hockey team in 1933; gatewaytheatre.com

4th – 28th – Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival; family friendly events at various venues; vcbf.ca

4th – May 9th – Bed and Breakfast; Granville Island Stage, Arts Club; a charming comedy about being out and finding home; artsclub.com

5th – 28th – Cherry Docs, Pacific Theatre; “Provocative — the kind of theatre that gives you something to talk about afterwards.” – CBC; pacifictheatre.org

14th – 23rd – Canadian Film Week, Vancity Theatre; viff.org

17th – May 5th – Dead People’s Things, Studio 16, 1555 W. 7th Ave.; presented by Zee Zee Theatre; tickets.theatrewire.com

24th – 27th – Out Again at the Inn, Havana Theatre, Commercial Drive; a Leaping Thespians original comedy; leapingthespians.com

25th – May 19th – The Great Leap; Goldcorp Stage, BMO Theatre, Arts Club; a cultural exploration of family, sacrifice and cultural and political difference; artsclub.com

My Book Club Selections for 2019

(Descriptions are from Amazon)

Chloe Benjamin – The Immortalists

Washington Post Notable Book; An NPR Book of the Year; A LibraryReads Top 10 Book of the Year
If you knew the date of your death, how would you live your life?

It’s 1969 in New York City’s Lower East Side, and word has spread of the arrival of a mystical woman, a traveling psychic who claims to be able to tell anyone the day they will die. The Gold children—four adolescents on the cusp of self-awareness—sneak out to hear their fortunes.

The prophecies inform their next five decades. Golden-boy Simon escapes to the West Coast, searching for love in ’80s San Francisco; dreamy Klara becomes a Las Vegas magician, obsessed with blurring reality and fantasy; eldest son Daniel seeks security as an army doctor post-9/11; and bookish Varya throws herself into longevity research, where she tests the boundary between science and immortality.

A sweeping novel of remarkable ambition and depth, The Immortalists probes the line between destiny and choice, reality and illusion, this world and the next. It is a deeply moving testament to the power of story, the nature of belief, and the unrelenting pull of familial bonds.

Esi Edugyan – Washington Black

Winner of the 2018 Scotiabank Giller Prize

When two English brothers arrive at a Barbados sugar plantation, they bring with them a darkness beyond what the slaves have already known. Washington Black – an eleven year-old field slave – is horrified to find himself chosen to live in the quarters of one of these men. But the man is not as Washington expects him to be. His new master is the eccentric Christopher Wilde – naturalist, explorer, inventor and abolitionist – whose obsession to perfect a winged flying machine disturbs all who know him. Washington is initiated into a world of wonder: a world where the night sea is set alight with fields of jellyfish, where a simple cloth canopy can propel a man across the sky, where even a boy born in chains may embrace a life of dignity and meaning – and where two people, separated by an impossible divide, can begin to see each other as human.

But when a man is killed one fateful night, Washington is left to the mercy of his new masters. Christopher Wilde must choose between family ties and young Washington’s life. What follows is a flight along the eastern coast of America, as the men attempt to elude the bounty that has been placed on Washington’s head. Their journey opens them up to the extraordinary: to a dark encounter with a necropsicist, a scholar of the flesh; to a voyage aboard a vessel captained by a hunter of a different kind; to a glimpse through an unexpected portal into the Underground Railroad. This is a novel of fraught bonds and betrayal. What brings Wilde and Washington together ultimately tears them apart, leaving Washington to seek his true self in a world that denies his very existence.

From the blistering cane fields of Barbados to the icy plains of the Canadian Arctic, from the mud-drowned streets of London to the eerie deserts of Morocco, Washington Black teems with all the strangeness of life. This inventive, electrifying novel asks, What is Freedom? And can a life salvaged from the ashes ever be made whole?

Rachel Kushner – The Mars Room

EW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • TIME’S #1 FICTION TITLE OF THE YEAR • NEW YORK TIMESNOTABLE BOOK OF 2018; FINALIST for the MAN BOOKER PRIZE and LONGLISTED for the ANDREW CARNEGIE MEDAL

It’s 2003 and Romy Hall is at the start of two consecutive life sentences at Stanville Women’s Correctional Facility, deep in California’s Central Valley. Outside is the world from which she has been severed: the San Francisco of her youth and her young son, Jackson. Inside is a new reality: thousands of women hustling for the bare essentials needed to survive; the bluffing and pageantry and casual acts of violence by guards and prisoners alike; and the deadpan absurdities of institutional living, which Kushner evokes with great humor and precision.

Stunning and unsentimental, The Mars Room demonstrates new levels of mastery and depth in Kushner’s work. It is audacious and tragic, propulsive and yet beautifully refined. As James Wood said in The New Yorker, her fiction “succeeds because it is so full of vibrantly different stories and histories, all of them particular, all of them brilliantly alive.”

Liane Moriarty – Nine Perfect Strangers

From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Big Little Lies

Could ten days at a health resort really change you forever? In Liane Moriarty’s latest page-turner, nine perfect strangers are about to find out…

Nine people gather at a remote health resort. Some are here to lose weight, some are here to get a reboot on life, some are here for reasons they can’t even admit to themselves. Amidst all of the luxury and pampering, the mindfulness and meditation, they know these ten days might involve some real work. But none of them could imagine just how challenging the next ten days are going to be.

Frances Welty, the formerly best-selling romantic novelist, arrives at Tranquillum House nursing a bad back, a broken heart, and an exquisitely painful paper cut. She’s immediately intrigued by her fellow guests. Most of them don’t look to be in need of a health resort at all. But the person that intrigues her most is the strange and charismatic owner/director of Tranquillum House. Could this person really have the answers Frances didn’t even know she was seeking? Should Frances put aside her doubts and immerse herself in everything Tranquillum House has to offer – or should she run while she still can?

It’s not long before every guest at Tranquillum House is asking exactly the same question.

Combining all of the hallmarks that have made her writing a go-to for anyone looking for wickedly smart, page-turning fiction that will make you laugh and gasp, Liane Moriarty’s Nine Perfect Strangers once again shows why she is a master of her craft.

Lawrence Osborne – Beautiful Animals

“A seductively menacing new thriller by Lawrence Osborne…who unites Graham Greene’s fondness for foreign soil with Patricia Highsmith’s fascination with the nastier coils of the human psyche.” –NPR’s “Fresh Air”

FINANCIAL TIMES
 SUMMER PICK 2017; GUARDIAN BEST HOLIDAY READS 2017

On a hike during a white-hot summer break on the Greek island of Hydra, Naomi and Samantha make a startling discovery: a man named Faoud, sleeping heavily, exposed to the elements, but still alive. Naomi, the daughter of a wealthy British art collector who has owned a villa in the exclusive hills for decades, convinces Sam, a younger American girl on vacation with her family, to help this stranger. As the two women learn more about the man, a migrant from Syria and a casualty of the crisis raging across the Aegean Sea, their own burgeoning friendship intensifies. But when their seemingly simple plan to help Faoud unravels all must face the horrific consequences they have set in motion.

In this brilliant psychological study of manipulation and greed, Lawrence Osborne explores the dark heart of friendship, and shows just how often the road to hell is paved with the best of intentions.

Kathy Page – Dear Evelyn

WINNER OF THE 2018 ROGERS WRITERS’ TRUST FICTION PRIZE; A 2018 KIRKUS BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR; A GLOBE AND MAIL BEST BOOK OF 2018; A QUILL & QUIRE BEST BOOK OF 2018

Born between the wars on a working-class London street, Harry Miles wins a scholarship and a chance to escape his station, but discovers instead that poetry is what offers him real direction. While searching for more of it he meets Evelyn Hill on the steps of Battersea Library. The two fall in love as the world prepares once again for war, but their capacity to care for each other over the ensuing decades becomes increasingly tested.

Twisting and startling, harrowing and deeply tender, Dear Evelyn explores how two very different people come together to shape and reshape each other over a lifetime. It is a compelling and unconventional love story that will leave its mark on any reader who has ever loved.

Waubgeshig Rice – Moon of the Crusted Snow

With winter looming, a small northern Anishinaabe community goes dark. Cut off, people become passive and confused. Panic builds as the food supply dwindles. While the band council and a pocket of community members struggle to maintain order, an unexpected visitor arrives, escaping the crumbling society to the south. Soon after, others follow.

The community leadearship loses its grip on power as the visitors manipulate the tired and hungry to take control of the reserve. Tensions rise and, as the months pass, so does the death toll due to sickness and despair. Frustrated by the building chaos, a group of young friends and their families turn to the land and Anishinaabe tradition in hopes of helping their community thrive again. Guided through the chaos by an unlikely leader named Evan Whitesky, they endeavor to restore order while grappling with a grave decision.

Blending action and allegory, Moon of the Crusted Snow upends our expectations. Out of catastrophe comes resilience. And as one society collapses, another is reborn.

Heather Rose – The Museum of Modern Love

Art will wake you up. Art will break your heart. There will be glorious days. If you want eternity you must be fearless.” –Heather Rose

Our hero, Arky Levin, has reached a creative dead end. An unexpected separation from his wife was meant to leave him with the space he needs to work composing film scores, but it has provided none of the peace of mind he needs to create. Guilty and restless, almost by chance he stumbles upon an art exhibit that will change his life. Based on a real piece of performance art that took place in 2010, the installation that the fictional Arky Levin discovers is inexplicably powerful. Visitors to the Museum of Modern Art sit across a table from the performance artist Marina Abramovic, for as short or long a period of time as they choose. Although some go in skeptical, almost all leave moved. And the participants are not the only ones to find themselves changed by this unusual experience: Arky finds himself returning daily to watch others with Abramovic. As the performance unfolds over the course of 75 days, so too does Arky. As he bonds with other people drawn to the exhibit, he slowly starts to understand what might be missing in his life and what he must do. This is a book about art, but it is also about success and failure, illness and happiness. It’s about what it means to find connection in a modern world. And most of all, it is about love, with its limitations and its transcendence.

Jessica Shattuck – The Women in the Castle

INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER; GoodReads Choice Awards Semifinalist 

Three women, haunted by the past and the secrets they hold

Set at the end of World War II, in a crumbling Bavarian castle that once played host to all of German high society, a powerful and propulsive story of three widows whose lives and fates become intertwined—an affecting, shocking, and ultimately redemptive novel from the author of the New York Times Notable Book The Hazards of Good Breeding.

 Amid the ashes of Nazi Germany’s defeat, Marianne von Lingenfels returns to the once-grand castle of her husband’s ancestors, an imposing stone fortress now fallen into ruin following years of war. The widow of a resister murdered in the failed July 20, 1944, plot to assassinate Adolf Hitler, Marianne plans to uphold the promise she made to her husband’s brave conspirators: to find and protect their wives, her fellow resistance widows.

First Marianne rescues six-year-old Martin, the son of her dearest childhood friend, from a Nazi reeducation home. Together, they make their way across the smoldering wreckage of their homeland to Berlin, where Martin’s mother, the beautiful and naive Benita, has fallen into the hands of occupying Red Army soldiers. Then she locates Ania, another resister’s wife, and her two boys, now refugees languishing in one of the many camps that house the millions displaced by the war.

As Marianne assembles this makeshift family from the ruins of her husband’s resistance movement, she is certain their shared pain and circumstances will hold them together. But she quickly discovers that the black-and-white, highly principled world of her privileged past has become infinitely more complicated, filled with secrets and dark passions that threaten to tear them apart. Eventually, all three women must come to terms with the choices that have defined their lives before, during, and after the war—each with their own unique share of challenges.

Also Nominated

Kate Atkinson – Transcription

From the bestselling author of Life After Life, a new novel that explores the repercussions of one young woman’s espionage work during World War II.

Juliet Armstrong is a dissatisfied radio producer in a 1950s London that is recovering from the war as much as she is. During World War Two, Juliet was conscripted into service, transcribing conversations between an MI5 agent and a ring of suspected German sympathizers. The seemingly dull work quickly plunged Juliet into a treacherous world of code words and secret meetings where Juliet herself was sent into the field. These moments of intrigue and romance feel like a lifetime ago as Juliet trudges through her commute, her job and her new life. But as Juliet and the rest of London find ways to return to normal, her routine is upended by an encounter with a mysterious man from her past life.

Haunted by the relationships and actions of her past and facing a very real threat in the present, Juliet cannot escape the repercussions of her work for the government. With no other choice, Juliet is quickly pulled back into the life of espionage she thought she’d left behind. Kate Atkinson’s latest novel brings mid-century London to life in a gripping tale of deception and consequences.

David Bergen – Stranger

From Giller prize–winning author of The Time in Between and Canada Reads finalist for The Age of Hope comes a stirring tale that lays bare the bonds of motherhood, revealing just how far a mother will go to reclaim her stolen child.

Íso, a young Guatemalan woman, works at a fertility clinic at Ixchel, in the highlands of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas. She tends to the rich northern women who visit the clinic hoping that the waters of the nearby lake might increase their chances of conception. Like many of the women working at the clinic, Íso is aware of the resident American doctor, Eric Mann. Soon Íso is his secret lover, stealing away with Dr. Mann on long motorcycle rides through the mountains and enjoying beach vacations with Eric and his doctor friends. But their tryst does not last long. Dr. Mann decides he will return to the US, and a freak accident cuts the couple’s time together even shorter. Before Íso can tell Dr. Mann that she is pregnant, he is gone.

After the birth of her daughter, the baby is taken from her. The director of the clinic informs Íso that her child is in America. Determined to reclaim her stolen daughter, Íso makes her way north through Mexico, eventually crossing illegally into a United States divided into military zones. Travelling without documentation, and with little money, Íso descends into a world full of danger. In a place of shifting boundaries, Íso must determine who she can trust and how much, aware that she might lose her daughter forever.

The profound intelligence and political resonance we have come to expect from Bergen sit front and centre in Stranger, contributing to the growing legacy of this Giller Prize–winning author. With its themes of dislocation and disruption, of power and vulnerability, of rich and of poor, Stranger is a powerfully resonant political novel for our times.

Tana French – The Witch Elm

Named a New York Times Notable Book of 2018’ “A brilliant new work of suspense from “the most important crime novelist to emerge in the past 10 years” (Washington Post) and an excellent holiday gift.

From the writer who “inspires cultic devotion in readers” (The New Yorker) and has been called “incandescent” by Stephen King, “absolutely mesmerizing” by Gillian Flynn, and “unputdownable” (People), comes a gripping new novel that turns a crime story inside out.

Toby is a happy-go-lucky charmer who’s dodged a scrape at work and is celebrating with friends when the night takes a turn that will change his life – he surprises two burglars who beat him and leave him for dead. Struggling to recover from his injuries, beginning to understand that he might never be the same man again, he takes refuge at his family’s ancestral home to care for his dying uncle Hugo. Then a skull is found in the trunk of an elm tree in the garden – and as detectives close in, Toby is forced to face the possibility that his past may not be what he has always believed.

A spellbinding standalone from one of the best suspense writers working today, The Witch Elm asks what we become, and what we’re capable of, when we no longer know who we are.

Heather Morris – the Tattooist of Auschwitz

The #1 International Bestseller & New York Times Bestseller

This beautiful, illuminating tale of hope and courage is based on interviews that were conducted with Holocaust survivor and Auschwitz-Birkenau tattooist Ludwig (Lale) Sokolov—an unforgettable love story in the midst of atrocity. In April 1942, Lale Sokolov, a Slovakian Jew, is forcibly transported to the concentration camps at Auschwitz-Birkenau. When his captors discover that he speaks several languages, he is put to work as a Tätowierer (the German word for tattooist), tasked with permanently marking his fellow prisoners.

Imprisoned for over two and a half years, Lale witnesses horrific atrocities and barbarism—but also incredible acts of bravery and compassion. Risking his own life, he uses his privileged position to exchange jewels and money from murdered Jews for food to keep his fellow prisoners alive.

One day in July 1942, Lale, prisoner 32407, comforts a trembling young woman waiting in line to have the number 34902 tattooed onto her arm. Her name is Gita, and in that first encounter, Lale vows to somehow survive the camp and marry her.

A vivid, harrowing, and ultimately hopeful re-creation of Lale Sokolov’s experiences as the man who tattooed the arms of thousands of prisoners with what would become one of the most potent symbols of the Holocaust, The Tattooist of Auschwitz is also a testament to the endurance of love and humanity under the darkest possible conditions.

Kim Stanley Robinson – New York 2140

NOMINATED FOR THE HUGO AWARD FOR BEST NOVEL 2018

As the sea levels rose, every street became a canal. Every skyscraper an island. For the residents of one apartment building in Madison Square, however, New York in the year 2140 is far from a drowned city.

There is the market trader, who finds opportunities where others find trouble. There is the detective, whose work will never disappear – along with the lawyers, of course.

There is the internet star, beloved by millions for her airship adventures, and the building’s manager, quietly respected for his attention to detail. Then there are two boys who don’t live there, but have no other home – and who are more important to its future than anyone might imagine.

Lastly there are the coders, temporary residents on the roof, whose disappearance triggers a sequence of events that threatens the existence of all – and even the long-hidden foundations on which the city rests.

New York 2140 is an extraordinary and unforgettable novel, from a writer uniquely qualified to tell the story of its future.

Mark Sakatomoto – Forgiveness

WINNER of CBC Canada Reads; Finalist for the Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction and the OLA Evergreen Award; #1 National Bestseller

When the Second World War broke out, Ralph MacLean chose to escape his troubled life on the Magdalen Islands in eastern Canada and volunteer to serve his country overseas. Meanwhile, in Vancouver, Mitsue Sakamoto saw her family and her stable community torn apart after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

Like many young Canadian soldiers, Ralph was captured by the Japanese army. He would spend the war in prison camps, enduring pestilence, beatings and starvation, as well as a journey by hell ship to Japan to perform slave labour, while around him his friends and countrymen perished. Back in Canada, Mitsue and her family were expelled from their home by the government and forced to spend years eking out an existence in rural Alberta, working other people’s land for a dollar a day.

By the end of the war, Ralph emerged broken but a survivor. Mitsue, worn down by years of back-breaking labour, had to start all over again in Medicine Hat, Alberta. A generation later, at a high school dance, Ralph’s daughter and Mitsue’s son fell in love.

Although the war toyed with Ralph’s and Mitsue’s lives and threatened to erase their humanity, these two brave individuals somehow surmounted enormous transgressions and learned to forgive. Without this forgiveness, their grandson Mark Sakamoto would never have come to be.

Gary Shteyngart – Lake Success

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review • NPR • The Washington Post • O: The Oprah Magazine • Glamour • Library Journal • Kirkus Reviews • Newsday • Pamela Paul, KQED • Financial Times • The Globe and Mail; LONGLISTED FOR THE CARNEGIE MEDAL FOR EXCELLENCE IN FICTION 

Narcissistic, hilariously self-deluded, and divorced from the real world as most of us know it, hedge-fund manager Barry Cohen oversees $2.4 billion in assets. Deeply stressed by an SEC investigation and by his three-year-old son’s diagnosis of autism, he flees New York on a Greyhound bus in search of a simpler, more romantic life with his old college sweetheart. Meanwhile, his super-smart wife, Seema—a driven first-generation American who craved the picture-perfect life that comes with wealth—has her own demons to face. How these two flawed characters navigate the Shteyngartian chaos of their own making is at the heart of this piercing exploration of the 0.1 Percent, a poignant tale of familial longing and an unsentimental ode to what really makes America great.

“Shteyngart, perhaps more than any American writer of his generation, is a natural. He is light, stinging, insolent and melancholy. . . . The wit and the immigrant’s sense of heartbreak—he was born in Russia—just seem to pour from him. The idea of riding along behind Shteyngart as he glides across America in the early age of Trump is a propitious one. He doesn’t disappoint.”—The New York Times 

“From one of our finest comic novelists comes a work with equal parts smarts and heart to go with the steady hilarity of its plot and prose. . . . Surely the funniest book of the year, indeed one of the best overall.”Newsday 

Merilyn Simonds – Refuge

To whom do we offer refuge ― and why?

After a life that rubbed up against the century’s great events in New York City, Mexico, and Montreal, 96-year-old Cassandra MacCallum is surviving well enough, alone on her island, when a young Burmese woman contacts her, claiming to be kin. Curiosity, loneliness, and a slender filament of hope prompts the old woman to accept a visit. But Nang’s story of torture and flight provokes memories in Cass that peel back, layer by layer, the events that brought her to this moment ― and forces her, against her will, to confront the tragedy she has refused for half a century. Could her son really be Nang’s grandfather? What does she owe this girl, who claims to be stateless because of her MacCallum blood? Drawn, despite herself, into Nang’s search for refuge, Cass struggles to accept the past and find a way into whatever future remains to her.

Kim Thuy – Vi

LONGLISTED FOR THE SCOTIABANK GILLER PRIZE

The daughter of an enterprising mother and a wealthy, spoiled father who never had to grow up, Vi was the youngest of their four children and the only girl. They gave her a name that meant “precious, tiny one,” destined to be cosseted and protected, the family’s little treasure.

But the Vietnam War destroys life as they’ve known it. Vi, along with her mother and brothers, manages to escape–but her father stays behind, leaving a painful void as the rest of the family must make a new life for themselves in Canada.

While her family puts down roots, life has different plans for Vi. Taken under the wing of Hà, a worldly family friend, and her diplomat lover, Vi tests personal boundaries and crosses international ones, letting the winds of life buffet her. From Saigon to Montreal, from Suzhou to Boston to the fall of the Berlin Wall, she is witness to the immensity of geography, the intricate fabric of humanity, the complexity of love, the infinite possibilities before her. Ever the quiet observer, somehow Vi must find a way to finally take her place in the world.

January 2019 – Things To Do in Vancouver


Jan. 12th – Feb. 9th – Circle Game: Reimagining the Music of Joni Mitchell, Firehall Arts Centre, firehallartscentre.ca

Jan. 15th – 19th – Dakh Daughters – 7 actresses with musical instruments; York Theatre, thecultch.com

Jan. 15th – 20th – The Illusionists, Queen Elizabeth Theatre; live from Broadway; ticketmaster.ca

Jan. 17th – 26th – The Open House, Havana Theatre, “wildly subversive and darkly hilarious take on family drama”; sticksandstonestheatre.com

Jan. 15th – Feb. 3rd – Mrs. Krishna’s Party, The Cultch, thecultch.com

Jan. 17th – Feb. 2nd – Lion in the Streets; award winning playwright, Judith Thompson; Chan Centre, UBC; theatrefilm.ubc.ca

Jan 17th – Feb. 3rd – PuSH, International Performing Arts Festival; info at pushfestival.ca

Jan. 18th – Feb. 3rd – Dine Out Vancouver Festival; dine-outvancouver.com

Jan. 18th – Feb. 9th – A Prayer for Owen Meany, Pacific Theatre; pacifictheatre.org

Jan. 24th – Feb. 24th – The Matchmaker, Stanley, Arts Club; mix-ups and match-ups in a classic farce; artsclub.com

Jan. 29th – Feb. 2nd – This Is The Point, The Cultch Historic Theatre; a play about love, sex and disability, thecultch.com

Jan. 31st – Feb. 24th – True Crime, Goldcorp Theatre at the BMO Theatre Centre, Arts Club; artsclub.com

November 2018 – Things To Do In Vancouver

Nov. 1st – 3rd – The Ones We Leave Behind, Historic Theatre, The Cultch; presented by Vancouver Asian Canadian Theatre; thecultch.com

Nov. 1st – 4th – Backbone; Gravity & Other Myths; Vancouver Playhouse; from Australia; an international circus hit; thecultch.com

Nov. 1st – 10th – The Wolves; Pacific Theatre; A pack of teenage girls prepares for battle on the soccer field; pacifictheatre.org

Nov.  1st – 18th – Sweat, Stanley Theatre, Arts Club; “A tough yet empathetic portrait of the America that came undone” —The New Yorker; Winner of the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Drama; artsclub.com

Nov. 1st – Dec. 15th – Patricia Piccinini’s CURIOUS IMAGININGS at the Patricia Hotel -immersive art installation; https://www.vancouverbiennale.com/event/patricia-piccininis-curious-imaginings-exhibit-at-the-patricia-hotel/

Nov. 2nd & 3rd – VIMY; Kay Meek Centre; drama about a group of Canadian soldiers convalescing in a field hospital; kaymeek.com

Nov. 3rd – Professor Fabrizio Zillbotti, Yale – Love, Money and Parenting: How Economics Explains the Way We Raise Our Kids; Vancouver Institue Lectures; free; 8:15 pm; Lecture hall No. 2, Instructional Resources Centre, UBC; http://vancouverinstitute.ca

Nov. 7th – Dec. 2nd – Vancouver Jewish Film Festival; http://www.vjff.org/

Nov. 8th – 17th – Empire of the Son , Gateway Theatre in Richmond; funny, poignant, autobiographical one-man show; gatewaytheatre.com

Nov. 10th – Professor Wade Davis, UBC – Of War and Remembrance:  Canada and The Great War; Vancouver Institute Lectures; free; 8:15 pm; Lecture hall No. 2, Instructional Resources Centre, UBC; http://vancouverinstitute.ca

Nov. 13th – Isabel Allende; UBC Connects; ubc.ca/ubcconnects

Nov. 15th – 18th – Beautiful: The Carole King Musical, Queen Elizabeth Theatre; Broadway Across Canada; Tony and Grammy Award winning play; ticketmaster.ca

Nov. 15th – 18th – Christmas at Hycroft; doors 11:00 am; christmasathycroft.com

Nov. 15th – 24th – Sense and Sensibility; The Blue Shore at Capilano University, North Vancouver; Jane Austen; tickets.capilanou.ca

Nov. 15th – 24th – Much Ado About Nothing; Frederic Wood Theatre, UBC; fresh take on Shakespeare; ubcthetretickets.com

Nov. 15th – Dec. 1st – Ring of Fire, the Music of Johnny Cash, Deep Cove Shaw Theatre, North Vancouver; firstimpressionstheatre.com

Nov. 15th – Dec. 1st – The Enemy, Firehall Arts Centre; political drama with an ethically compromised anti-hero; firehallartscentre.ca

Nov. 15th – Dec. 2nd – The Suppliant Women, Jericho Arts Centre; Aeschylus’ tale of a group of women fleeing male agression and looking for refuge across a foreign border; unitedplayers.com

Nov. 15th – Dec. 2nd – Mortified, Studio 58, Langara College; humorous and dark; studio58.ca

Nov. 15th – Dec. 30th – Miss Bennet: Christmas at Pemberley; Granville Island Stage; artsclub.com

Nov. 17th – The Honourable Steven L. Point, Former Lieutenant Governor of BC – Reconciliation Begins With You; Vancouver Institute Lectures; free; 8:15 pm; Lecture hall No. 2, Instructional Resources Centre, UBC; http://vancouverinstitute.ca

Nov. 18th – Dead Poets Reading Series; Vancouver Public Library Central Branch; 3:00 to 5:00, free; vpl.ca/events

Nov. 19th – Vancouver Giller Light Bash, CBC Studio, 700 Hamilton; 6:30 pm, $20; frontiercollege.akaraisin.com/ui/gillerlightbash

Nov. 21st – Dec. 24th – The Vancouver Christmas Market, Jack Poole Plaza; vancouverchristmasmarket.com

Nov. 22nd – Writers Showcase, Vancouver Public Library, 6:30 – 8:00 pm; free; vpl.ca/events

Nov. 22nd – Dec. 8th – Hir, The Annex, Seymour St.; comic exploration of family dysfunction and patriarchy; pitheatre.com/hir

Nov. 22nd – Dec. 30th – Blind Date; Goldcorp Stage at the BMO Theatre Centre; one actor, one audience member; one blind date; artsclub.com

Nov. 24 – Professor Leonard Foster, UBC – Are Bees Really Dying? Are We the Cause or the Solution?; Vancouver Institute Lectures; free; 8:15 pm; Lecture hall No. 2, Instructional Resources Centre, UBC; http://vancouverinstitute.ca

COMING UP:

Jan 17th – Feb. 3rd – PuSH, International Performing Arts Festival; info at pushfestival.ca

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Movie Reviews

I’ve moved my movie reviews to Letterboxd under Chunks.  They are very short there.  My son, Jason Romilly, has reviews there as well – his are very funny.