March 2018 – Things To Do In Vancouver

March 1st – 3rd – An Almost Holy Picture, Pacific Theatre; pacifictheatre.org

March 1st – 10th – Fun Home, Granville Island Stage, Arts Club; a coming of age musical; artsclub.com

March 1st – 10th – Teachers, Jericho Arts Centre; It is 1990. Student teacher must negotiate the snakepit, but at a terrible cost.; jerichoartscentre.com

March 1st – 15th – Chutzpah 2018 Festival; dance, music, theatre, comedy; chutzpahfestival.com

March 1st – 17th – A Few Good Men, Deep Cove Shaw Theatre, North Vancouver; firstimpressionstheatre.com

March 3rd – Making Russia Great Again: Putin and the Roots of the New Global Populism, Professor David McDonald, University of Wisconsin; Vancouver Institute Lecture; 8:15 pm; free;  Lecture Hall No.2, Instructional Resources Centre, UBC; http://vancouverinstitute.ca

March 7th – 25th – Forget About Tomorrow, Goldcorp Stage at the BMO Theatre Centre, Arts Club; Jill Daum’s play about her husband, John Mann’s Alzheimers; artsclub.com

March 10th – The Democracy Spectrum: From Norway to the US to Afghanistan, Dr. Ann Jones, American Scholar, writer and journalist; Vancouver Institute Lecture; 8:15 pm; free;  Lecture Hall No.2, Instructional Resources Centre, UBC; http://vancouverinstitute.ca

March 17th – 1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed, Professor Eric Cline, Director, Capital Archaeological Institute, George Washington University; Vancouver Institute Lecture; 8:15 pm; free;  Lecture Hall No.2, Instructional Resources Centre, UBC; http://vancouverinstitute.ca

March 17th – April 21st – Chelsea Hotel: The Songs of Leonard Cohen; Firehall Arts Theatre; hit show brought back – 6 artists playing 17 different instruments; firehallartscentre.ca/onstage/chelsea

March 21st – 31st – Butcher, Historic Theatre, The Cultch;  thriller in which a war criminal reckons with one of his victims; thecultch.com

March 22nd – April 22nd – The Humans, Stanley Theatre, Arts Club; family drama; 2017 Tony Award winner

March 23rd – April 14th – Bar Mitzvah Boy, Pacific Theatre; by Mark Leiren-Young; pacifictheatre.org

March 23rd – April 15th – Enron, Jericho Arts Centre; rise and fall of the Enron corporation; jerichoartscentre.com

March 24th – Economic Inequality in America: Facts, Fiction and How to Tell the Difference, Professor Sylvia Nasar, Graduate School of Journalism, Columbia University; Vancouver Institute Lecture; 8:15 pm; free;  Lecture Hall No.2, Instructional Resources Centre, UBC; http://vancouverinstitute.ca

March 30th – April 23rd – Cherry Blossom Festival; venues and parks around town

 

 

February 2018 – Things To Do In Vancouver

Feb. 1st – 3rd – Dublin Oldschool – Emmet Kirwan (Ireland); The Cultch Historic Theatre; pushfestival.ca

Feb. 1st – 4th – Reassembled, Slightly Askew, VanCity Culture Lab; new kind of story-telling; thecultch.com

Feb. 1st – 4th – Sleeping Beauty Dreams; Presentation House Theatre; Mexico’s famed Marionetas de la Esquina; phtheatre.org

Feb. 1st – 10th – Shit, Firehall Arts Centre; women and girls who defy gender demarcations; firehallartscentre.ca

Feb. 1st –  11th – Topdog/Underdog; Goldcorp Stage at the BMO Centre; Arts Club; competition between 2 African-American brothers; Pulitzer prize winner; artsclub.com

Feb. 1st – 11th – Merrily We Roll Along, Jericho Arts Centre; traditional showbiz musical turned on its head; unitedplayers.com

Feb. 1st – 25th – Jitters, Stanley Theatre, Arts Club; raucous comedy; artsclub.com

Feb. 2nd – 17th – Ruined, Pacific Theatre; pacifictheatre.org

Feb. 3rd – Unseen Enemy: The Risks of a Global Pandemic and How to Prevent It, Ms. Janet Tobias, American Award Winning director and producer; Vancouver Institute Lecture; 8:15 pm; free;  Lecture Hall No.2, Instructional Resources Centre, UBC; http://vancouverinstitute.ca

Feb. 6th – Music Talks with Neil Ritchie, Yves Montand, West Van Library, 10:30 am to 12:30; free

Feb. 6th – 11th – Motown the Musical, Queen Elizabeth Theatre, Broadway across Canada; http://queenelizabeth.theatervancouver.com/

Feb. 8th – Sam Sullivan’s Public Salon, Vancouver Playhouse, 7:30 pm; 8 people share their thoughts and passions – fast paced; ticketstonight.ca

Feb. 8th – March 10th – Fun Home, Granville Island Stage, Arts Club; a coming of age musical; artsclub.com

Feb. 10th – Defeating the Evolution of Cancer: Measurements, Math and Lessons from Microbesm, Professor Samuel Aparicio, UBC,  Vancouver Institute Lecture; 8:15 pm; free;  Lecture Hall No.2, Instructional Resources Centre, UBC; http://vancouverinstitute.ca

Feb. 13th –  Music Talks with Neil Ritchie, Dolly Parton, West Van Library, 10:30 am to 12:30; free

Feb. 15th – March 15th – Chutzpah 2018 Festival; dance, music, theatre, comedy; chutzpahfestival.com

Feb. 20th – Music Talks with Neil Ritchie, Freddie Mercury, West Van Library, 10:30 am to 12:30; free

Feb. 21st – March 3rd – An Almost Holy Picture, Pacific Theatre; pacifictheatre.org

Feb. 24th – Risk to Democracy When the Fourth Estate Comes Under Attack, Professor Peter W. Klein, UBC; Vancouver Institute Lecture; 8:15 pm; free;  Lecture Hall No.2, Instructional Resources Centre, UBC; http://vancouverinstitute.ca

Feb. 27th –  Music Talks with Neil Ritchie, Marilyn Horn, West Van Library, 10:30 am to 12:30; free

 

 

 

 

January 2018 – Things To Do in Vancouver

Jan. 1st – Polar Bear Swim – English Bay

Jan 1st – 6th – Bright Nights Christmas Train, Stanley Park, evenings

Jan. 1st – 6th – Van Dusen Gardens Festival of Lights; 4:30 – 10:00 pm

Jan. 1st – 6th – East Van Panto:  Snow White and the Seven Dwarves, York Theatre; thecultch.com

Jan. 1st – 13th – Beauty and the Beast, Stanley Theatre, Arts Club, artsclub.com

Jan. 9th – 27th – Hot Brown Honey, York Theatre; smash hit at Edinburgh Fringe Festival; tickets at thecultch.com

Jan. 10th – 20th – The Pipeline Project; Firehall Arts Centre; play about the ongoing political battles around pipeline expansion; firehallartscentre.ca

Feb. 16th/17th – Onegin, Kay Meek Centre; Arts Club Theatre Company On Tour; kaymeek.com

Jan. 16th – 20th – Black Boys, Historic Theatre, The Cultch; Buddies in Bad Times Theatre/Saga Collectif (Toronto); thecultch.com

Jan. 17th – Feb. 4th – Reassembled, Slightly Askew, VanCity Culture Lab; new kind of story-telling; thecultch.com

Jan. 24th – 28th – I’m Not Here; HIstoric Theatre; thecultch.com

Jan. 25th – Feb. 4th – Sleeping Beauty Dreams; Presentation House Theatre; Mexico’s famed Marionetas de la Esquina; phtheatre.org

Jan. 25th – Feb. 25th – Jitters, Stanley Theatre, Arts Club; raucous comedy; artsclub.com

Jan. 26th – Feb. 11th – Topdog/Underdog; Goldcorp Stage at the BMO Centre; Arts Club; competition between 2 African-American brothers; artsclub.com

Jan. 26th – Feb. 11th – Merrily We Roll Along, Jericho Arts Centre; traditional showbiz musical turned on its head; unitedplayers.com

Jan. 27th Afghanistan Up Close & from Afar: An Afghan Journalist Reports for the New York Times, Mr. Ruhullah Khpalwak, Afghan Journalist; Vancouver Institute Lecture, 8:15 pm, Lecture Hall No. 2, Instructional Resources Centre, UBC, free; http://vancouverinstitute.ca

Jan. 27th – Feb. 10th – Shit, Firehall Arts Centre; women and girls who defy gender demarcations; firehallartscentre.ca

Jan. 30th – Music Talks with Neil Ritchie, Sarah Vaughan, West Van Library, 10:30 am to 12:30; free

Jan. 30th – Feb. 3rd – Dublin Oldschool – Emmet Kirwan (Ireland); The Cultch Historic Theatre; pushfestival.ca

December 2017 – Things To Do In Vancouver

Dec. 1st – 24th – The Day Before Christmas; Goldcorp Stage at BMO Theatre Centre, Arts Club; artsclub.com

Dec. 1st – 29th – Gingerbread Lane, Hyatt Regency Hotel

Dec. 1st – 31st – Cirque du Soleil: Kurios – Cabinet of Curiosities; Big Top, Concord Pacific Plaza; cirquedusoleil.com/kurios

Dec. 1st – 31st – Onegin, Granville Island Stage, Arts Club; artsclub.com

Dec. 1st – 31st – Christmas at Canada Place, 8:00 am to 11:00 pm

Dec. 1st – Jan. 6th – Bright Nights Christmas Train, Stanley Park, evenings

Dec. 1st – Jan. 6th – Van Dusen Gardens Festival of Lights; 4:30 – 10:00 pm

Dec. 1st – Jan. 6th – East Van Panto:  Snow White and the Seven Dwarves, York Theatre; thecultch.com

Dec. 5th to 22nd – Little Dickens: The Daisy Theatre with Ronnie Burkett – always amazing; thecultch.com

Dec. 7th – Jan. 13th – Beauty and the Beast, Stanley Theatre, Arts Club, artsclub.com

Dec. 13th- Hilary Clinton Live, Vancouver Convention Centre (West); 11:00 am; $89 – $3,000; https://reg.conexsys.com/hcv17

Dec. 19th – 23rd – Christmas Presence; Pacific Theatre; pacifictheatre.org

Coming:

Jan. 1st – Polar Bear Swim – English Bay

My Book Club Choices for 2018

(Descriptions from Amazon)

Jennifer Egan – Manhattan Beach

Anna Kerrigan, nearly twelve years old, accompanies her father to visit Dexter Styles, a man who, she gleans, is crucial to the survival of her father and her family. She is mesmerized by the sea beyond the house and by some charged mystery between the two men.

‎Years later, her father has disappeared and the country is at war. Anna works at the Brooklyn Naval Yard, where women are allowed to hold jobs that once belonged to men, now soldiers abroad. She becomes the first female diver, the most dangerous and exclusive of occupations, repairing the ships that will help America win the war. One evening at a nightclub, she meets Dexter Styles again, and begins to understand the complexity of her father’s life, the reasons he might have vanished.

With the atmosphere of a noir thriller, Egan’s first historical novel follows Anna and Styles into a world populated by gangsters, sailors, divers, bankers, and union men. Manhattan Beach is a deft, dazzling, propulsive exploration of a transformative moment in the lives and identities of women and men, of America and the world.

Jenny Erpenback – Go, Went, Gone

Go, Went, Gone is the masterful new novel by the acclaimed German writer Jenny Erpenbeck, “one of the most significant German-language novelists of her generation” (The Millions). The novel tells the tale of Richard, a retired classics professor who lives in Berlin. His wife has died, and he lives a routine existence until one day he spies some African refugees staging a hunger strike in Alexanderplatz. Curiosity turns to compassion and an inner transformation, as he visits their shelter, interviews them, and becomes embroiled in their harrowing fates.

Go, Went, Gone is a scathing indictment of Western policy toward the European refugee crisis, but also a touching portrait of a man who finds he has more in common with the Africans than he realizes. Exquisitely translated by Susan Bernofsky, Go, Went, Gone addresses one of the most pivotal issues of our time, facing it head-on in a voice that is both nostalgic and frightening.

Terry Fallis – Up and Down

On his first day at Turner King, David Stewart quickly realizes that the world of international PR (affectionately, known as “the dark side”) is a far cry from his previous job with the Canadian government. For one, he missed the office memo on the all-black dress code; for another, there are enough acronyms and jargon to make his head spin. Before he even has time to find the washroom, David is assigned a major project: devise a campaign to revitalize North America’s interest in the space program–maybe even show NASA’s pollsters that watching a shuttle launch is more appealing than going out for lunch with friends. The pressure is on, and before long, David finds himself suggesting the most out-of-this-world idea imaginable: a Citizen Astronaut lottery that would send one American and one Canadian to the International Space Station. Suddenly, David’s vaulted into an odyssey of his own, navigating the corporate politics of a big PR agency; wading through the murky waters of U.S.-Canada relations; and trying to hold on to his new job while still doing the right thing.

Equal parts clever and satirical, thoughtful and affecting, Up and Down is Terry Fallis at his best, confirming his status as a literary star.

Joe Ide – IQ

East Long Beach. The LAPD is barely keeping up with the neighborhood’s high crime rate. Murders go unsolved, lost children unrecovered. But someone from the neighborhood has taken it upon himself to help solve the cases the police can’t or won’t touch.

They call him IQ. He’s a loner and a high school dropout, his unassuming nature disguising a relentless determination and a fierce intelligence. He charges his clients whatever they can afford, which might be a set of tires or a homemade casserole. To get by, he’s forced to take on clients that can pay.

This time, it’s a rap mogul whose life is in danger. As Isaiah investigates, he encounters a vengeful ex-wife, a crew of notorious cutthroats, a monstrous attack dog, and a hit man who even other hit men say is a lunatic. The deeper Isaiah digs, the more far reaching and dangerous the case becomes.

Min Jin Lee – Pachinko

One of the New York Times Book Review’s Ten Best Books of the Year

In the early 1900s, teenaged Sunja, the adored daughter of a crippled fisherman, falls for a wealthy stranger at the seashore near her home in Korea. He promises her the world, but when she discovers she is pregnant-and that her lover is married-she refuses to be bought. Instead, she accepts an offer of marriage from a gentle, sickly minister passing through on his way to Japan. But her decision to abandon her home, and to reject her son’s powerful father, sets off a dramatic saga that will echo down through the generations.

Richly told and profoundly moving, Pachinko is a story of love, sacrifice, ambition, and loyalty. From bustling street markets to the halls of Japan’s finest universities to the pachinko parlors of the criminal underworld, Lee’s complex and passionate characters-strong, stubborn women, devoted sisters and sons, fathers shaken by moral crisis-survive and thrive against the indifferent arc of history.

Celeste Ng – Little Fires Everywhere

From the bestselling author of Everything I Never Told You, a riveting novel that traces the intertwined fates of the picture-perfect Richardson family and the enigmatic mother and daughter who upend their lives.

In Shaker Heights, a placid, progressive suburb of Cleveland, everything is planned – from the layout of the winding roads, to the colors of the houses, to the successful lives its residents will go on to lead. And no one embodies this spirit more than Elena Richardson, whose guiding principle is playing by the rules.

Enter Mia Warren – an enigmatic artist and single mother – who arrives in this idyllic bubble with her teenaged daughter Pearl, and rents a house from the Richardsons. Soon Mia and Pearl become more than tenants: all four Richardson children are drawn to the mother-daughter pair. But Mia carries with her a mysterious past and a disregard for the status quo that threatens to upend this carefully ordered community.

When old family friends of the Richardsons attempt to adopt a Chinese-American baby, a custody battle erupts that dramatically divides the town–and puts Mia and Elena on opposing sides.  Suspicious of Mia and her motives, Elena is determined to uncover the secrets in Mia’s past. But her obsession will come at unexpected and devastating costs.

Little Fires Everywhere explores the weight of secrets, the nature of art and identity, and the ferocious pull of motherhood – and the danger of believing that following the rules can avert disaster.

 Sofi Oksanen – Norma

From the international bestselling author of Purge and When the Doves Disappeared comes a spellbinding new novel set in present-day Helsinki about a young woman with a fantastical secret who is trying to solve the mystery of her mother’s death.

When Anita Naakka jumps in front of an oncoming train, her daughter, Norma, is left alone with the secret they have spent their lives hiding: Norma has supernatural hair, sensitive to the slightest changes in her mood ― and the moods of those around her ― moving of its own accord, corkscrewing when danger is near. And so it is her hair that alerts her, while she talks with a strange man at her mother’s funeral, that her mother may not have taken her own life.

Setting out to reconstruct Anita’s final months ― sifting through puzzling cell phone records, bank statements, video files ― Norma begins to realize that her mother knew more about her hair’s power than she let on: a sinister truth beyond Norma’s imagining.

As Sofi Oksanen leads us deeper into Norma’s world, weaving together past and present, she gives us a dark family drama that is a searing portrait of both the exploitation of women’s bodies and the extremes to which people will go for the sake of beauty.

 Michael Redhill – Bellevue Square

Jean Mason has a doppelganger. She’s never seen her, but others swear they have. Apparently, her identical twin hangs out in Kensington Market, where she sometimes buys churros and drags an empty shopping cart down the streets, like she’s looking for something to put in it. Jean’s a grown woman with a husband and two kids, as well as a thriving bookstore in downtown Toronto, and she doesn’t rattle easily—not like she used to. But after two customers insist they’ve seen her double, Jean decides to investigate.

She begins at the crossroads of Kensington Market: a city park called Bellevue Square. Although she sees no one who looks like her, it only takes a few visits to the park for her to become obsessed with the possibility of encountering her twin in the flesh. With the aid of a small army of locals who hang around in the park, she expands her surveillance, making it known she’ll pay for information or sightings. A peculiar collection of drug addicts, scam artists, philanthropists, philosophers and vagrants—the regulars of Bellevue Square—are eager to contribute to Jean’s investigation. But when some of them start disappearing, she fears her alleged double has a sinister agenda. Unless Jean stops her, she and everyone she cares about will face a fate much stranger than death.

 Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Riveting, heart-wrenching, and full of Old Hollywood glamour, The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo is one of the most captivating reads of 2017.” —BuzzFeed

In this entrancing novel “that speaks to the Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor in us all” (Kirkus Reviews), a legendary film actress reflects on her relentless rise to the top and the risks she took, the loves she lost, and the long-held secrets the public could never imagine.

Aging and reclusive Hollywood movie icon Evelyn Hugo is finally ready to tell the truth about her glamorous and scandalous life. But when she chooses unknown magazine reporter Monique Grant for the job, no one is more astounded than Monique herself. Why her? Why now?

Monique is not exactly on top of the world. Her husband has left her, and her professional life is going nowhere. Regardless of why Evelyn has selected her to write her biography, Monique is determined to use this opportunity to jumpstart her career.

Summoned to Evelyn’s luxurious apartment, Monique listens in fascination as the actress tells her story. From making her way to Los Angeles in the 1950s to her decision to leave show business in the ‘80s, and, of course, the seven husbands along the way, Evelyn unspools a tale of ruthless ambition, unexpected friendship, and a great forbidden love. Monique begins to feel a very real connection to the legendary star, but as Evelyn’s story near its conclusion, it becomes clear that her life intersects with Monique’s own in tragic and irreversible ways.

“Heartbreaking, yet beautiful” (Jamie Blynn, Us Weekly), The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo is “Tinseltown drama at its finest” (Redbook): a mesmerizing journey through the splendor of old Hollywood into the harsh realities of the present day as two women struggle with what it means—and what it costs—to face the truth.

 Also Nominated

Frederick Backman – Bear Town

The #1 New York Times bestselling author of A Man Called Ove returns with a dazzling, profound novel about a small town with a big dream—and the price required to make it come true.

People say Beartown is finished. A tiny community nestled deep in the forest, it is slowly losing ground to the ever encroaching trees. But down by the lake stands an old ice rink, built generations ago by the working men who founded this town. And in that ice rink is the reason people in Beartown believe tomorrow will be better than today. Their junior ice hockey team is about to compete in the national semi-finals, and they actually have a shot at winning. All the hopes and dreams of this place now rest on the shoulders of a handful of teenage boys.

Being responsible for the hopes of an entire town is a heavy burden, and the semi-final match is the catalyst for a violent act that will leave a young girl traumatized and a town in turmoil. Accusations are made and, like ripples on a pond, they travel through all of Beartown, leaving no resident unaffected.

Beartown explores the hopes that bring a small community together, the secrets that tear it apart, and the courage it takes for an individual to go against the grain. In this story of a small forest town, Fredrik Backman has found the entire world.

Terry Fallis – The Best Laid Plans

Here’s the set up: A burnt-out politcal aide quits just before an election–but is forced to run a hopeless campaign on the way out. He makes a deal with a crusty old Scot, Angus McLintock–an engineering professor who will do anything, anything, to avoid teaching English to engineers–to let his name stand in the election. No need to campaign, certain to lose, and so on.

Then a great scandal blows away his opponent, and to their horror, Angus is elected. He decides to see what good an honest M.P. who doesn’t care about being re-elected can do in Parliament. The results are hilarious–and with chess, a hovercraft, and the love of a good woman thrown in, this very funny book has something for everyone.

Will Ferguson – The Shoe on the Roof

From the Giller Prize–winning novelist of 419 comes the startling, funny, and heartbreaking story of a psychological experiment gone wrong.

Ever since his girlfriend ended their relationship, Thomas Rosanoff’s life has been on a downward spiral. A gifted med student, he has spent his entire adulthood struggling to escape the legacy of his father, an esteemed psychiatrist who used him as a test subject when he was a boy. Thomas lived his entire young life as the “Boy in the Box,” watched by researchers behind two-way glass.

But now the tables have turned. Thomas is the researcher, and his subjects are three homeless men, all of whom claim to be messiahs—but no three people can be the one and only saviour of the world. Thomas is determined to “cure” the three men of their delusions, and in so doing save his career—and maybe even his love life. But when Thomas’s father intervenes in the experiment, events spin out of control, and Thomas must confront the voices he hears in the labyrinth of his own mind.

The Shoe on the Roof is an explosively imaginative tour de force, a novel that questions our definitions of sanity and madness, while exploring the magical reality that lies just beyond the world of scientific fact.

Gail Honeyman – Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

“A charmer…satisfyingly quirky.”—Janet Maslin, The New York Times “Books to Breeze Through This Summer”

“This wacky, charming novel…draws you in with humor, then turns out to contain both a suspenseful subplot and a sweet romance….Hilarious and moving.”—People 

Meet Eleanor Oliphant: She struggles with appropriate social skills and tends to say exactly what she’s thinking. Nothing is missing in her carefully timetabled life of avoiding social interactions, where weekends are punctuated by frozen pizza, vodka, and phone chats with Mummy.

But everything changes when Eleanor meets Raymond, the bumbling and deeply unhygienic IT guy from her office. When she and Raymond together save Sammy, an elderly gentleman who has fallen on the sidewalk, the three become the kinds of friends who rescue one another from the lives of isolation they have each been living. And it is Raymond’s big heart that will ultimately help Eleanor find the way to repair her own profoundly damaged one.

Smart, warm, uplifting, Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine is the story of an out-of-the-ordinary heroine whose deadpan weirdness and unconscious wit make for an irresistible journey as she realizes. . .

Nicole Krauss – Forest Dark

**A New York Times Notable Book of the Year; A Globe and Mail Best Book of the Year**

“One of America’s most important novelists” (New York Times), the award-winning, New York Timesbestselling author of The History of Love, conjures an achingly beautiful and breathtakingly original novel about personal transformation that interweaves the stories of two disparate individuals—an older lawyer and a young novelist—whose transcendental search leads them to the same Israeli desert.

Jules Epstein, a man whose drive, avidity, and outsized personality have, for sixty-eight years, been a force to be reckoned with, is undergoing a metamorphosis. In the wake of his parents’ deaths, his divorce from his wife of more than thirty years, and his retirement from the New York legal firm where he was a partner, he’s felt an irresistible need to give away his possessions, alarming his children and perplexing the executor of his estate. With the last of his wealth, he travels to Israel, with a nebulous plan to do something to honor his parents. In Tel Aviv, he is sidetracked by a charismatic American rabbi planning a reunion for the descendants of King David who insists that Epstein is part of that storied dynastic line. He also meets the rabbi’s beautiful daughter who convinces Epstein to become involved in her own project—a film about the life of David being shot in the desert—with life-changing consequences.

But Epstein isn’t the only seeker embarking on a metaphysical journey that dissolves his sense of self, place, and history. Leaving her family in Brooklyn, a young, well-known novelist arrives at the Tel Aviv Hilton where she has stayed every year since birth. Troubled by writer’s block and a failing marriage, she hopes that the hotel can unlock a dimension of reality—and her own perception of life—that has been closed off to her. But when she meets a retired literature professor who proposes a project she can’t turn down, she’s drawn into a mystery that alters her life in ways she could never have imagined.

Bursting with life and humor, Forest Dark is a profound, mesmerizing novel of metamorphosis and self-realization—of looking beyond all that is visible towards the infinite.

Shaun Tan – The Arrival

“Tan’s lovingly laid out and masterfully rendered tale about the immigrant experience is a documentary magically told.” — Art Spiegelman, author of Maus

“An absolute wonder.” — Marjane Satrapi, author of Persepolis

“A magical river of strangers and their stories!” — Craig Thompson, author of Blankets

“A shockingly imaginative graphic novel that captures the sense of adventure and wonder that surrounds a new arrival on the shores of a shining new city. Wordless, but with perfect narrative flow, Tan gives us a story filled with cityscapes worthy of Winsor McCay.” — Jeff Smith, author of Bone

“Shaun Tan’s artwork creates a fantastical, hauntingly familiar atmosphere… Strange, moving, and beautiful.” — Jon J. Muth, Caldecott Medal-winning author of Zen Shorts

“Bravo.” — Brian Selznick, Caldecott Medal-winning author of The Invention of Hugo Cabret

“Magnificent.” — David Small, Caldecott Medalist

 Katherena Vermette – The Break

2017 Burt Award for First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Literature Finalist; Winner, Amazon.ca First Novel Award; Winner, Margaret Laurence Award for Fiction; Winner, Carol Shields Winnipeg Book Award; Winner, McNally Robinson Book of the Year; A Canada Reads 2017 finalist; 2016 Governor General’s Literary Award Finalist; 2016 Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize Finalist; CBC Best Canadian Debut Novels 2016; Globe and Mail Best 100 Books of 2016

When Stella, a young Métis mother, looks out her window one evening and spots someone in trouble on the Break ― a barren field on an isolated strip of land outside her house ― she calls the police to alert them to a possible crime.

In a series of shifting narratives, people who are connected, both directly and indirectly, with the victim ― police, family, and friends ― tell their personal stories leading up to that fateful night. Lou, a social worker, grapples with the departure of her live-in boyfriend. Cheryl, an artist, mourns the premature death of her sister Rain. Paulina, a single mother, struggles to trust her new partner. Phoenix, a homeless teenager, is released from a youth detention centre. Officer Scott, a Métis policeman, feels caught between two worlds as he patrols the city. Through their various perspectives a larger, more comprehensive story about lives of the residents in Winnipeg’s North End is exposed.

A powerful intergenerational family saga, The Break showcases Vermette’s abundant writing talent and positions her as an exciting new voice in Canadian literature.